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  1. Psalm 136 (Hodu)Sim Shalom, page 72
  2. Ozi V’Zimrat Ya (Shirat Hayam) – Sim Shalom, page 92
  3. Nishmat Kol chai – Sim Shalom, page 334
  4. Shochen Ad – Sim Shalom, page 336
  5. El Adon – Sim Shalom, page 342
  6. El Adon or Sim Shalom – Chassidic – Sim Shalom, page 342 or 362
  7. Ram V’Nisa – Sim Shalom, page 352
  8. Mimkomcha 1 (Shacharit Kedusha) – Sim Shalom, page 356
  9. Mimkomcha 2 (Shacharit Kedusha) – Sim Shalom, page 356
  10. Sim Shalom – Sim Shalom, page 362
  11. Ana Avda – Sim Shalom, page 398
  12. Sh’ma Yisrael (Torah service)Sim Shalom, page 398
  13. L’cha Adonai – Sim Shalom, page 398
  14. Nafshi Cholat – Sim Shalom, page 252
  15. Ana El Na chant (during the Torah service, when reciting the Mi Shebeirach) – click here for written music
  16. Ki Mitziyon (while wrapping the Torah)Sim Shalom, page 394
  17. Eitz Chayim Hi – Sim Shalom, page 426
  18. Musaf Kedusha – Sim Shalom, page 432
  19. Musaf Kedusha (Sher) – Sim Shalom, page 432
  20. Ein Keloheinu – Sim Shalom, page 508
  21. Y’hi Shalom – Sim Shalom, page 508
  22. L’ma’an Achai – Sim Shalom, page 508
  23. Adon Olam – Sim Shalom, page 514
  24. Adon Olam (Djerba) – Sim Shalom, page 514

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Listen and watch the beautiful video clip which was made as part of the Rav Siach Program in Israel.

The beautiful Piyut for the High Holidays “Come to Us with Mercy” was composed by the scholar and lyricist, Freha bat Avraham bar Adiva, born in Morocco in the 18th century. Cantor Saralee Shrell-Fox , a member of Maayanot in Jerusalem, and a cantor at Moreshet Yisrael, composed this beautiful melody together with her son Maayan. It may be that many liturgical poems have been written by women and have disappeared over the generations. Freha’s supplication might only be one example amongst a wealth of poems and feminine creation that was produced in Spain and in North Africa.

For the lyrics in Hebrew & English click here:http://www.masorti.org.il/ravsiach/rspage.php?pid=282

Please note: Pages listed are from Mahzor Lev Shalem

  1. Ahat Sha’alti (Hasidic) | Page 27 | sung by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan*
    From Psalm 27, recited during the entire month of Elul in preparation for the High Holidays, and during the ten days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.
  2. Yihyu L’Ratzon (Joel Engel) | Page 139 | sung by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan*
    This simple melody to text at the end of the silent Amidah provides a chance to reflect as we complete our silent prayer and transition into the leader’s repetition. It can be used throughout the year
  3. Hayom Tamtzeinu (traditional) | Page 170 | sung by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan
    This piyyut concludes the repetition of the Musaf Amidah on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur and is our final plea for all that is good.
  4. Avinu Malkeinu (Max Janowski, folk) | Page 92 | sung by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan*
    For many, seeing or hearing this prayer evokes powerful memories of the High Holiday services of our childhood.
  5. Adonai Roi (Gerald Cohen) | Page 293 | sung by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan
    The Lord is my shepherd…Psalm 23, sung during the Yizkor service.
  6. V’chol Ma’aminim (Israel Goldfarb) | Page 146 | sung by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan
    A 1,500-year-old piyyut set to music by Israel Goldfarb, composer of hundreds of popular congregational tunes including Shalom Aleichem.
  7. Haben Yakir Li (Samuel Malavsky) | Page 161 | sung by HaZamir Kfar Saba 
    Jeremiah 31:20: Is it not Ephraim, my precious child, whom I remember fondly even when I speak against him?
* arrangement & piano, Joyce Rosenzweig

 

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  1. Yihyu L’ratzon: A melody that will be sung by all the minyanim at the conclusion of the silent amidah.
  2. K’vakarat Roeh Edro (Hadar)*: Found right after “Un’taneh Tokef”, this melody leads right into “B’Rosh Hashanah Yikateivun …
  3. Ki Ch’Shimcha: An extension of the “Un’taneh Tokef” prayer, the words for this melody, which is from the song “Acheinu”, are sandwiched between the line “U’Teshuva, U’Tefila, U’Tzedaka…” and the Kedusha.
  4. Ein Kitzvah: This popular modzitzer tune is used for the paragraph immediately preceding the Musaf Kedusha.  This recording comes from the Israeli group Kol AchaiClick here for more of their music!
  5. Chamol Al Ma’asecha (Hadar)*: This melody comes in right after the Kedushah.
  6. V’Chol Ma’aminim 1: This is immediately after “Chamol”. You may recognize the melody as a popular Carlebach tune which we’ve actually used at Minyan Koleinu on Shabbat morning for “El Adon”. It’s repetitive and easy to learn!
  7. V’Chol Ma’aminim 2: A different melody for the same piyyut as #3, found right after “Chamol”. We will use both of the melodies at some point during the Yamin Noraim.
  8. Simcha L’Artzecha: This melody comes shortly before the “Malchuyot” portion of the repetition of the Musaf Amidah.
  9. V’Ye’etayu (Hadar)*: Just after “Simcha L’Artzecha,” this is a great participatory melody. All you need to learn is four words and lots of “nai nai nai”s!
  10. Galeh: This powerful tune, found in the middle of the text shortly before the Malchuyot section, has only a few words to learn.
  11. Shehu Note Shamayim: A fun, easy-to-learn melody for the section immediately following the bowing in Aleinu.
  12. HaYom Harat Olam: This is the paragraph just after the shofar-blowing at the end of each section of the repetition of the Musaf Amidah. It appears three times, so it is definitely worth learning!
  13. NEW!HaVen Yakir Li 2: This can be found in the middle of the “Zichronot” portion of the repetition of the Musaf Amidah. We heard this melody performed by the Israeli chapter of HaZamir.
  14. HaVen Yakir Li: This can be found in the middle of the “Zichronot” portion of the repetition of the Musaf Amidah.
  15. B’Sefer Chayim: This is the paragraph right after “Sim Shalom” toward the end of the repetition of the Musaf Amidah.
  16. Hayom Hayom Hayom: This melody actually only uses the word “Hayom” one time per line! This is the “Hayom” prayer at the end of the repetition.
  17. Hayom Hayom Hayom 2: This melody, an original composition by our very own Rabbi Julia Andelman, lends a majestic feel to the “Hayom” prayer at the end of the repetition of the musaf amidah.
  18. Vahaviotim: This melody follows immediately after Hayom.*Some of these recordings have been taken from the Kehilat Hadar CD, Pri Eitz Hadar, which was produced under the direction of our very own Rabbi Julia Andelman.  We thank Hadar for allowing us to share these melodies with you.  To learn more about the Pri Eitz Hadar CD or to download all of the music, please go to the Kehilat Hadar website.

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  1. Or Zarua LaTzadik: As we take out the Torahs before Kol Nidre, we will sing this melody.
  2. Tov L’Hodot: One of the psalms for Shabbat.  We use this psalm when Kol Nidre falls on a Friday night (as it did in 2011).
  3. Yihyu L’ratzon: See RH Musaf “1”.
  4. Ya’ale Tachanuneinu: One of the liturgical poems right after the silent amidah during the Kol Nidre service.
  5. HaNeshamah Lach: Feel free to hum along as the leader sings this melody during the Kol Nidre service.
  6. Thirteen Attributes: The popular thirteen attributes (“Adonai Adonai…”) appear many times during the Yom Kippur service. We will use this melody for some of those times.
  7. Salachti: A piyyut from the Yom Kippur Kol Nidre service (handout).
  8. Ki Hinei KaHomeir (Hadar)*: A piyyut from the Yom Kippur Kol Nidre service.
  9. Ki Hinei KaHomeir 2: same piyyut as above, but different melody.  We may be using the other one at Koleinu.
  10. Al Tashlicheinu: One of the lines of the “sh’ma koleinu” section during the Kol Nidre Service.
  11. Hu Ya’aneinu: A piyyut from the Kol Nidre Service, this melody has some great rhythm to it.
  12. Rachamana: Don’t be intimidated by this 4 word tongue twister!  It’s actually a meaningful play on words: “Rachamana de’anei le’aniyey aneina” (Merciful one, who answers the poor – answer us).
  13. Avinu Malkeinu (Hadar)*: Found in the first line of the Avinu Malkeinu prayer. This prayer is said during Shacharit on Rosh HaShanah, and therefore, this melody will be used at Koleinu only on Yom Kippur when it is not on a Shabbat.
  14. Yigdal: This is the very last piece of the evening service on the High Holidays. We’ll be using it at the end of the Kol Nidre service, in lieu of the of the slower traditional tune, in order to end our service on an energetic note.*Some of these recordings have been taken from the Kehilat Hadar CD, Pri Eitz Hadar, which was produced under the direction of our very own Rabbi Julia Andelman.  We thank Hadar for allowing us to share these melodies with you.  To learn more about the Pri Eitz Hadar CD or to download all of the music, please go to the Kehilat Hadar website.

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  1. Gam Ki Eilech: We will sing this melody together during the Yizkor service on Yom Kippur.
  2. Yihyu L’ratzon: See RH Musaf “1”.
  3. Ma’aseh Eloheinu: A piyyut from the Yom Kippur musaf service.
  4. K’vakarat Roeh Edro (Hadar)*: See RH Musaf “2”.
  5. Ki Ch’Shimcha: See RH Musaf “3”.
  6. Ein Kitzvah: See RH Musaf “4”.
  7. Chamol Al Ma’asecha (Hadar)*: See RH Musaf “5”.
  8. V’Chol Ma’aminim 1: See RH Musaf “6”.
  9. V’Chol Ma’aminim 2: See RH Musaf “7” .
  10. Simcha L’Artzecha: See RH Musaf “8”.
  11. V’Ye’etayu (Hadar)*: See RH Musaf “9”.
  12. Galeh: See RH Musaf “10”.
  13. Shehu Note Shamayim: See RH Musaf “11”.
  14. Mar’eh Kohein (Hadar)*: This melody describes the excitement of the children of Israel when they saw the high priest emerging from the Holy Tabernacle after making the most important offerings of the year. This comes at the end of the Avodah service during Yom Kippur Musaf, so stick around!
  15. Geller Niggun: We will use this beautiful niggun during the Martyrology.
  16. B’Sefer Chayim: See RH Musaf “14”.

* Some of these recordings have been taken from the Kehilat Hadar CD, Pri Eitz Hadar, which was produced under the direction of our very own Rabbi Julia Andelman.  We thank Hadar for allowing us to share these melodies with you.  To learn more about the Pri Eitz Hadar CD or to download all of the music, please go to the Kehilat Hadar website.

Tal | music by Jonathan Rimberg and Jeff Braverman, arrangement by Marsha Bryan Edelman

On the first day of Pesach, we recite a prayer for dew, with its own unique melody that is used only twice a year.  Enjoy this creative take on the special Tal music, sung at the 18th gala concert of HaZamir: The International Jewish High School Choir, at Lincoln Center in 2011.
 
Spice up your Seder with engaging melodies from a variety of traditions!   
As taught by Cantor Ronit Wolff Hanan, Rabbi Julia Andelman, Debbi Bohnen, Rabbi Eliezer Diamond, Adina Avery Grossman, Michal Telem and Adam Wall at our 2016 and 2017 Pesach melody workshops.
  • Download and print the packet that was used at the 2016 workshop – PesachSeder-melodies Handbook
    1. Kadesh Urechatz (Sephardic) | Found at the beginning of the Hagaddah
      An alternative melody to the traditional chanting of the order of the seder.
    2. Shene’emar | by M. Oysher
      During the Maggid section of the Haggadah, we say the word Shene’emar” very often.  This melody can be used to add a little excitement to the text!
    3. V’hi She’amda | by Yonatan Razel
      From the Maggid section of the Haggadah, shortly after the section about the four sons.
    4. B’chol Dor Vador | by Chaim Parchi
      From the end of the Maggid section of the Haggadah, right after the section about the Pesach, Matza, and Maror.
    5. Ma Ashiv 
      A soulful niggun set to the fourth paragraph of the Hallel section of the Haggadah.
    6. Lo Amut | as sung by Cantor Farid Dardashti 
      Another soulful melody; the text is in the middle of the Min Hameitzar paragraph of Hallel.
    7. Hodu L’Adomai Ki Tov | 3-part cannon 
      This tune can be used any time we recite Hallel.  For those who love multiple voice parts, this 3-part round works perfectly.
    8. Va’amartem Zevach Pesach
      From the Nirtzah section of the Haggadah (in some haggadot, it’s found at the end of Hallel).  Sing it all the way through to the end; it gets exciting, after 4 cups of wine!
    9. Ki Lo Naeh | by M. Oysher
      From the Nirtzah section of the Haggadah (in some haggadot, it’s found at the end of Hallel).
    10. Ki Lo Naeh | as heard by Rabbi Eliezer Diamond
      From the Nirtzah section of Hallel (in some Haggadot it’s found at the end of Hallel).  It’s amazing what we retain from our childhood!
    11. Adir Hu (traditional melody from Bucharest)
      From the Nirtzah section of the Haggadah.
    12. Echad Mi Yodea
      We’re almost done!  Just before Chad Gadya.
    13. Quen Supiense (Echad Mi Yodea in Ladino)
      Just before Chad Gadya.  If you’re looking for some interesting variety, try a fun tune in another language!

      Download the text for this one. 
    14. Chad Gadya (traditional chassidic melody)
      THE END of the Haggadah!  Don’t worry – if your tradition includes making animal noises, this melody will still work for you!
    15. Alla Fiera dell’Est (Italian Chad Gadya)
      THE END of the Haggadah!  It’s a mouse; not a baby goat (makes more sense that a cat ate a mouse, right?!).  You’ll definitely want to download the text for this one.
    16. Chad Gadya (“Wheee!”)
      THE END of the Haggadah!  This one is especially whimsical, even more so after 4 cups!

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The following five niggunim (melodies) were taught by Joey Weisenberg during an excellent Musician-in-Residence program, co-sponsored by the Adult Education Committee, Minyan Koleinu, and Tzipporei Shalom. We encourage you to listen to these melodies and use them at your Shabbat table or during Shabbat davening.

We hope that by learning the melodies, you will enhance your personal experience and enjoyment of davening.

Please click on the name of the song below to hear the melody. If you have trouble downloading the music, we would be happy to make a CD for you. Contact the Congregation Beth Sholom office to request a CD.

  1. Beregovsky Niggun – a popular melody used at Minyan Koleinu; can be adapted in a number of settings, i.e. Kedusha.
  2. Eliyahu HaNavi Niggun – regular melody used at Congregation Beth Sholom Havdalah services each week.
  3. Vizhniz Niggun – “The Walking Backwards” niggun.
  4. M’nucha v’Simcha – a beautiful tune for your Shabbat table.
  5. Shalom Aleichem – an interesting alternative to some of the popular melodies we use.
  6. Y’He Raava – this is a melody from the Twerski Family of Milwaukee and is used in the paragraph immediately before we take out the Torah; it is used as an alternative to Bei Ana Rachetz.
  7. Milwaukee March – another niggun from the Twerski family and can be used in a variety of settings, i.e.Shabbat Table, during davening or at a tisch.
  8. Havdallah Melody – a niggun from the Modgitz (or Modzitz) Chasidim. Works well with Havdallah, as well as other places during davening.
 
 
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Congregation Beth Sholom | 354 Maitland Ave., | Teaneck, NJ 07666 | Tel 201-833-2620

© Congregation Beth Sholom | Website by Agile Digital Solutions, LLC

Congregation Beth Sholom
354 Maitland Ave.,
Teaneck, NJ 07666
Tel 201-833-2620

© Congregation Beth Sholom
Website by Agile Digital Solutions, LLC